North Carolina Concealed Carry Laws
 

 Firearms Training By Elrod

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College Campus

Any educational property, public or private, of any kind is one of the prohibited carry area.

This prohibition applies in/on any school building or bus, school campus, grounds, recreational area, athletic field, or other property owned, used, or operated by any board of education or school board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any school.

                     Note Conditions!!

However, person with a concealed carry permit MAY have a handgun in a closed compartment or container (gun vault) within the person's locked vehicle or a locked container securely affixed to the person's vehicle.  The person may unlock the vehicle to enter or exit the vehicle, provided the handgun remains in the closed compartment at all times and the vehicle is locked immediately following the entrance or exit.

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Please note non-public (private) educational facilities may still post prohibiting carrying a concealed handgun in accordance with N.C.G.S. 14-415.11 (c)(8).

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Question: Do I have to remove all my guns from my home since I home school my child?  If you are home schooling you do not have to remove your firearms.  But home schooling co-ops where other home schooling children meet in your home the law does not address this issue.
Home schools as defined in G.S. 115C-563(a).

Question: What do I do with my concealed carry Firearm when I drop off or pick up my child at school?

Just know that you must place your weapon in the closed compartment or container BEFORE you arrive on the school property.

Or you must park off of the school's property and leave your weapon and ammo in your vehicle then walk your child to school and return back to your vehicle that is parked off of school property.  The gun and ammo can not come on the school property unless you properly secure your concealed carry weapon according to the law. 

Question: Is Duke Hospital, UNC Hospital and Wake Med considered educational property? Yes.

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North Carolina General Statute § 14‑269.2. 

Weapons on campus or other educational property.

(a)        The following definitions apply to this section:

(1)        Educational property. – Any school building or bus, school campus, grounds, recreational area, athletic field, or other property owned, used, or operated by any board of education or school board of trustees, or directors for the administration of any school.

(1a)      Employee. – A person employed by a local board of education or school whether the person is an adult or a minor.

(1b)      School. – A public or private school, community college, college, or university.

(2)        Student. – A person enrolled in a school or a person who has been suspended or expelled within the last five years from a school, whether the person is an adult or a minor.

(3)        Switchblade knife. –A knife containing a blade that opens automatically by the release of a spring or a similar contrivance.

(4)        Weapon. – Any device enumerated in subsection (b), (b1), or (d) of this section.

(b)        It shall be a Class I felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school. Unless the conduct is covered under some other provision of law providing greater punishment, any person who willfully discharges a firearm of any kind on educational property is guilty of a Class F felony. However, this subsection does not apply to a BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, or air pistol.

(b1)      It shall be a Class G felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine, or powerful explosive as defined in G.S. 14‑284.1, on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school. This subsection shall not apply to fireworks.

(c)        It shall be a Class I felony for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind on educational property. However, this subsection does not apply to a BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, or air pistol.

(c1)      It shall be a Class G felony for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any dynamite cartridge, bomb, grenade, mine, or powerful explosive as defined in G.S. 14‑284.1 on educational property. This subsection shall not apply to fireworks.

(d)        It shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slung shot, leaded cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razors and razor blades (except solely for personal shaving), firework, or any sharp‑pointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction, and maintenance, on educational property.

(e)        It shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor for any person to cause, encourage, or aid a minor who is less than 18 years old to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any BB gun, stun gun, air rifle, air pistol, bowie knife, dirk, dagger, slung shot, leaded cane, switchblade knife, blackjack, metallic knuckles, razors and razor blades(except solely for personal shaving), firework, or any sharp‑pointed or edged instrument except instructional supplies, unaltered nail files and clips and tools used solely for preparation of food, instruction, and maintenance, on educational property.

(f)         Notwithstanding subsection (b) of this section it shall be a Class 1 misdemeanor rather than a Class I felony for any person to possess or carry, whether openly or concealed, any gun, rifle, pistol, or other firearm of any kind, on educational property or to a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by a school if:

(1)        The person is not a student attending school on the educational property or an employee employed by the school working on the educational property; and

(1a)      The person is not a student attending a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by the school at which the student is enrolled or an employee attending a curricular or extracurricular activity sponsored by the school at which the employee is employed; and

(2)        Repealed by Session Laws 1999‑211, s. 1, effective December 1, 1999, and applicable to offenses committed on or after that date.

(3)        The firearm is not loaded, is in a motor vehicle, and is in a locked container or a locked firearm rack.

(4)        Repealed by Session Laws 1999‑211, s. 1, effective December 1, 1999, and applicable to offenses committed on or after that date.

(g)        This section shall not apply to any of the following:

(1)        A weapon used solely for educational or school‑sanctioned ceremonial purposes, or used in a school‑approved program conducted under the supervision of an adult whose supervision has been approved by the school authority.

(1a)      A person exempted by the provisions of G.S. 14‑269(b).

(2)        Firefighters, emergency service personnel, and North Carolina Forest Service personnel, and any private police employed by a school, when acting in the discharge of their official duties.

(3)        Home schools as defined in G.S. 115C‑563(a).

(4)        Weapons used for hunting purposes on the Howell Woods Nature Center property in Johnston County owned by Johnston Community College when used with the written permission of Johnston Community College or for hunting purposes on other educational property when used with the written permission of the governing body of the school that controls the educational property.

(5)        A person registered under Chapter 74C of the General Statutes as an armed armored car service guard or an armed courier service guard when acting in the discharge of the guard's duties and with the permission of the college or university.

(6)        A person registered under Chapter 74C of the General Statutes as an armed security guard while on the premises of a hospital or health care facility located on educational property when acting in the discharge of the guard's duties with the permission of the college or university.

(h)        No person shall be guilty of a criminal violation of this section with regard to the possession or carrying of a weapon so long as both of the following apply:

(1)        The person comes into possession of a weapon by taking or receiving the weapon from another person or by finding the weapon.

(2)        The person delivers the weapon, directly or indirectly, as soon as practical to law enforcement authorities. (1971,c. 241, ss. 1, 2; c. 1224; 1991, c. 622, s. 1; 1993, c. 539, s. 164; c. 558, s.1; 1994, Ex. Sess., c. 14, s. 4(a), (b); 1995, c. 49, s. 1; 1997‑238, s.2; 1999‑211, s. 1; 1999‑257, s. 3, 3.1; 2003‑217, s. 1; 2004‑198,ss. 1, 2, 3; 2006‑264, s. 31; 2007‑427, s. 6; 2007‑511, s.12.

North Carolina Concealed Handgun Carry LawNOTE: The information concerning North Carolina Concealed Carry Law is to be considered for reference only. 

We are not lawyers.  We are not providing legal advice.

Use the information on our website at your own risk.  We expressly disclaim any liability for the accuracy of any information on our website.

We are not lawyers.  We are not providing legal advice.

NC Concealed Carry Laws recommends that you consult a qualified North Carolina lawyer if you have questions.

 

Firearms Training
by Elrod
Concealed Carry

“This class was very informational. I think before citizens are able to purchase a firearm they should be required to take this class. By being in this class I was able to learn my rights as a firearm owning citizen.

The class was perfect, it included an instructional video and there was material available for hands on learning. The instructors were very involved and really cared that you were able to understand the materials covered in the classroom. The instructors used real life scenarios that helped class retain material.”
Rodney Reddick

“This class is a very good class. It help me learn a lot of stuff, like safely. I feel good about this class.”
Shane Howell

“This class is great for the understanding and confidence in using a handgun. The instruction of the class helps you determine when and what you need to do in case any situation arises. As far as things to do better for the class, I would say keep everything the same. All points were explained as needed and were given opportunity to ask and get questions answered.”
Anthony Floyd
AnthonyFloyd@
Allstate.com